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Energy Efficient Windows + Doors

Windows and doors play an important role in a home’s energy efficiency. They help prevent drafts and can help insulate your home. Find out some of the top reasons to add energy efficient windows and doors, what makes windows energy efficient, and the savings energy efficient windows and doors can provide.1

Exterior view of white Marvin Replacement windows on a stucco home

Top Reasons to Add Energy Efficient Windows + Doors

The top reason why people add energy efficient windows and doors is the energy savings they can bring. Energy efficient windows and doors can reduce energy bills.1

New windows and doors can help you feel comfortable in your home when you replace drafty windows or leaky windows because they will seal tightly.

Window and patio door glass feature microscopic metallic coatings for home energy efficiency. Double pane windows and patio doors have a non-toxic gas fill between the panes that provide insulation.

Reducing your energy use also limits your carbon footprint to help the environment.  

 

 

Image of a man using a thermal monitor to detect the temperate of the air near an old wood window.

What are Energy Efficient Windows?

Energy efficient windows are built with the right materials and glass to reduce the amount of solar heat that enters a home in summer and retain heat in winter. Different types of glass coatings are suited for different climates. Marvin Replacement has four types of glass coating options: Low E1, Low E2, Low E3, and Low E3/ERS for home energy efficiency. When comparing fiberglass vs. vinyl window materials, it’s important to understand each materials’ ability to limit heat transfer from the outside.

A closeup view of an old rotten white window frame on a brick home.

How to Know if You Need Replacement Windows?

Knowing if you need replacement windows or a patio door can involve noticing damage, an increase in your energy bill, drafty windows or leaks, if they’ve become difficult to open and close, or if you see condensation between window panes. Replacing your windows or patio doors can improve your home’s energy efficiency and your home’s aesthetics.

Learn When to Replace Windows
thermostat

Save Money with an Energy Efficient Home

The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) estimates the average American household spends $1,500-$2,500 on energy bills annually; 45% of that is for heating and cooling. To find the latest tax credit updates, visit the ENERGY STAR® website. Here is Marvin Manufacturers’ Certification Statement.

ENERGY STAR estimates a homeowner can save between $493 and $568 a year on average, if they’re replacing single pane windows with ENERGY STAR-certified windows and between $253 and $373 when replacing clear double pane windows. 

ENERGY STAR-certified windows meet a set of criteria tested by the NFRC. ENERGY STAR qualification uses U-factor

U-factor

U-Factor is a measure of how well a window retains heat in a home. A higher U-Factor allows more heat to escape a home and a lower number will allow less heat to transfer out of a home.

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and SHGC ratings

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient measures how much heat from the sun enters a home. A lower SHGC number allows less heat.

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.

A Marvin Replacement design consultant reviews options with a couple.

How to Choose Energy Efficient Windows

Glass coatings, the number of glass panes, and a window’s gas fill can help you choose energy efficient windows. Ratings, like U-factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient, and Visible Transmittance

Visible Transmittance

Visible transmittance is the measure of visible light that will pass through a window. A higher VT number maximizes daylight.

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can all help you make a wise decision on energy efficient windows and doors, too. Spotting a blue ENERGY STAR logo can help you identify energy efficient windows quickly. You can also view window labels to view rating figures to see if the window will work well in your climate zone.

Diagram of glass with three metallic coatings.

Glass Coatings

Glass coatings play an important role in a home’s energy efficiency. Different climates require specific coatings to perform the best. Marvin Replacement’s Low E1 coating works well in colder climates because it allows more heat into a home while Low E3 works well in warmer climates because it can reject solar heat. Low E3/ERS can provide maximum efficiency year-round in all climates.

Example of a National Fenestration Rating Council window performance label.

Ratings

One way to quickly learn the energy efficiency of windows is to look up ENERGY STAR performance grade, U-factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) and Visible Transmittance (VT).  

Exterior view of a brick Delaware home with Marvin Replacement windows.

Efficiency in All Climates

Finding the best windows in hot or cold climates means picking the right glass coatings for your climate zone. Marvin Replacement’s Low E2 glass is 56% more efficient in summer and 49% more energy efficient in the winter. Low E3 glass is 70% more energy efficient in summer and 49% more energy efficient in winter.2

Showing 1-6 of 9

A man carries a white Marvin Replacement window with divided lites.
Types of Window Glass
There are several types of window glass and options to choose. Learn how specific types of glass can benefit your home. Marvin Replacement can tailor glass options to fit your home the best.
Window Glass Types
A Marvin Replacement design consultant shows a customer samples of window and patio door finishes.
When to Replace Your Windows
On installation day, our team of Marvin Replacement Certified Installers will arrive at your home to remove your old windows and install your new ones.
When to Replace Windows
An array of hinges, door handles, colors, and simulated lites for Marvin Replacement windows.
Window Features + Options
Discover the different design and feature options for your windows. View our window color options, hardware styles, and screen choices.
Window Features + Options
Winter Sliding Patio Door
Tips to Winterize Windows + Patio Doors
Prepping your windows and doors for winter doesn't take a lot of work. Try some of these tips to winterize your windows and patio doors.
Winterizing Window + Patio Door Tips
Gray draft stopper rests under a white window frame.
What Leaking Windows Mean for Your Home
Leaking windows can cause problems for your home. Learn how to spot window leaks and steps to take to fix leaky windows.
How to spot + fix leaking windows
Image of a man using a thermal monitor to detect the temperate of the air near an old wood window.
What Causes Drafty Windows?
Drafty windows are nuisance and can make your home less energy efficient. Find out what causes drafty windows and what you can do about them.
What Causes Drafty Windows?

Upgrade Your View with Marvin Replacement

Learn more about Marvin Replacement glass options and energy efficient replacement windows. Start improving your living by scheduling a free, no hassle design consultation with Marvin Replacement today!

Schedule Your Consultation

1Source 2023: D+R International in support of ENERGY STAR. Savings estimates are based on EnergyPlus 9.5 modeling for typical homes in 132 U.S. cities. Ranges are based on the average savings among homes in modeled cities. Actual savings will vary based on local climate conditions, utility rates, and individual home characteristics.

2Values are based on comparison of Marvin Replacement double-hung window U-Factor for clear dual pane glass non-metal frame default values from the 2018 International Energy Conservation Code “Glazed Fenestration” Default Tables.

Exterior image featuring Marvin Replacement Double Hung Windows in Ebony exterior finish.