Take $2,000 off your installed window and door project this March*

Image of a double hung window on the left side and an opened casement window in the right side

Casement vs. Double Hung Windows: Which is Best for Your Home?


Can’t decide between casement vs. double hung windows? They operate differently and each has advantages and disadvantages. Find out the benefits of double hung and casement windows to decide which window is right for your home.

What is a Casement Window?

A casement window is also known as a crank window because it opens and closes by turning a crank handle. Casement windows swing outward. They usually have a vertical rectangle shape. The difference between casement vs. awning windows is the window’s orientation. Awning windows have a horizontal orientation.

Animation of a casement window opening and closing

What is a Double Hung Window?

A double hung window has two sash that move up and down. The difference between a double hung vs. a single hung window is the top sash of a double hung window can move up and down. The top sash of a single hung window does not move.

Animated operation of a Marvin Replacement Double Hung Window

What’s the Difference Between Casement Windows and Double Hungs?

Casement windows and double hung windows have a few differences.

Operation

The biggest difference is how they open and close. Casement windows operate with a crank handle to swing out. Double hung windows slide up and down to open and close.

Screen Placement

Casement windows have screens on the interior side of a window, so they are more protected from weather and dirt. Double hung windows have screens on the exterior side of a window, so you may notice they accumulate a bit more dirt.

Viewing Area

Another difference between casement and double hung windows is the viewing area. Casement windows offer uninterrupted views. Double hung windows have a check rail

Check Rail

The horizontal portion of a double hung window where the top and bottom sash meet. Simulated check rails use divided lite bars to simulate the look of a double hung window in a casement or slider. Also known as meeting rail.

GO TO GLOSSARY
in the middle to divide the window into two sash.

Image of a person wiping an opened Marvin Replacement Casement window with a cloth.
A woman wipes the glass on a Marvin Replacement Double Hung window with grilles between the glass.

Cleaning

Marvin Replacement makes cleaning casement windows and double hung windows easy. Our casement windows can come with our Easy Wash® hinge (pictured above on the left side). Our Easy Wash® hinge leaves room between the sash and the window frame so you can reach through from inside your home to clean the window exterior. Our double hung windows tilt into a room so you can clean them inside your home, too.

What Do Casement and Double Hung Windows Have in Common?

Marvin Replacement Casement and Double Hung windows both are built with our Ultrex® fiberglass for durability and stability. Both window types come double paned

Pane

A pane refers to the piece of glass in a window. Windows can have one, two, or three panes of glass.

GO TO GLOSSARY
with energy efficient glass options. Our casement and double hung windows are also easy to clean from inside your home.

Casement Window Pros

  • Uninterrupted views

  • Wide opening for air circulation

  • Easy to open

  • Air-tight seal with latch locks

Casement Window Cons

  • Window A/C units won’t fit

  • Must remain free of outdoor obstructions like shrubs

Double Hung Window Pros

  • Top sash opens to allow warm air to escape while lower sash allows cool air in

  • Low maintenance

  • Can accommodate window A/C units

Double Hung Window Cons

  • Check rail obstructs views

  • Can be harder to reach to open and close in some spots

What’s More Energy Efficient: Casement or Double Hung Windows?

Marvin Replacement Casement and Double Hung windows both have energy efficient features. Casement windows can provide a tighter seal to prevent air leakage because of their latch lock. Older double hung windows can suffer air leakage if they don’t close tightly.

Things to Consider When Choosing Casement vs. Double Hung Windows

  • Natural Light: Both casement and double hung windows can provide natural light. A casement window doesn’t have a check rail like a double hung so it can offer clear views.

  • Size: Casement windows can have size limitations because the hardware needs to support the weight of the window sash. Double hung windows don’t face that problem, but they can also have size limitations in height.

  • Air Ventilation: Casement and double hung windows are some of the best windows to improve air circulation. Casement windows can open wide for ventilation and can capture cross breezes. Double hung windows can cycle warm air out through an opened upper sash and usher in cool air through an opened lower sash.

  • Placement: Casement windows work well above kitchen sinks because it can be harder to reach to open a double hung.

  • Home Style: Double hung windows fit traditional styled homes, especially when they have window grids. Double hung windows often appear in contemporary styled homes, too. Casement windows can also have grids to fit traditional homes. They also appear in contemporary styled homes.

  • Maintenance: Marvin Replacement Ultrex fiberglass windows require virtually no maintenance.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can double hung windows be replaced with casement windows?

Yes, you can replace double hung windows with casement windows in some cases. You’ll have to consider window dimensions if you plan to swap the window styles. Fortunately, Marvin Replacement custom sizes all our windows to fit your home.

What is the main drawback to the use of a casement window?

There aren’t many drawbacks with casement windows. They need special consideration because they swing outward. To ensure they open smoothly the area outside needs to remain free from obstructions, like shrubs and plants.


Back to All Articles

You May Also Like

Line drawing of a casement and awning window.

Casement vs. Awning Windows

Is an awning window just a casement window turned to the side? Not exactly. Both crank windows have unique styles that can make them better suited for different spaces. See the differences to find the right one for the right spot in your home.

Casement vs. Awning Windows  
Side by side view of a Marvin Replacement Bay and Bow window

Bay vs. Bow Windows: What's the Difference?

Not sure what the difference is between a bay window and a bow window? Both provide big views for your home but they do so differently. Find out the difference between a bay window vs a bow window.

Bay vs Bow Windows  
Side-by-side comparison of a single hung window and a double hung window

Double Hung Windows vs. Single Hung

Curious what makes a double hung window different from a single hung window? Or want to know why you'd want a double hung window vs. a single hung? Learn more about the differences to find the right one for your home.

Double Hung Windows vs. Single Hung  

Schedule Your Free Consultation Today!